In Conversation

British Cinema: Northern Realism vs. Southern Splendour? In Conversation with Tom Jackson

  Recently, I talked to Tom Jackson about a few British films. Here is the transcript of our recorded conversation Tom Draper: Unlike our previous talk Documentary Ethics and Aesthetics which looked at how a few contemporary documentaries experiment with the form and methods of documentary practice, today we are going to discuss British fictional… Continue reading British Cinema: Northern Realism vs. Southern Splendour? In Conversation with Tom Jackson

Articles

A Personal Note on 35mm v Digital Film Projection

Last week, I watched Quentin Tarantino’s Jackie Brown at the BFI Southbank in glorious 35mm, the first time I had seen a film in this format for over a year. The Tyneside Cinema – my local independent cinema and employer – like most mainstream and independent cinemas since the beginning of the digital (projection) age,… Continue reading A Personal Note on 35mm v Digital Film Projection

Film Reviews

The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, 2015)

It could be said that like the elongated motorway sequence in Solaris (1972), supposedly included to alienate audiences unworthy of an Andrei Tarkovsky film, Miroslav Slaboshpitsky offers a similar manoeuvre by warning us both in the trailer and at the film’s inception that The Tribe will include no subtitles, voice-over or any other explanation of… Continue reading The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, 2015)

Film Reviews

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2015)

In the first years of the 21st century, Hollywood discovered a thirst for male and female characters with superhuman powers. These extraordinary individuals were able to confront the type of modern crime that has progressively rendered the classical systems of state power – the police and governmental intelligence services – helpless. Exploiting the widespread paranoia… Continue reading Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2015)

Notes

2014: The Year’s Best Films

Here’s my list of the ten best films of the year: Leviathan (Andrey Zvyagintsev) Two Days, One Night (Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne)* Boyhood (Richard Linklater) Mr. Turner (Mike Leigh) The Wind Rises (Hayao Miyazaki) Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer) The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson) Starred Up (David Mackenzie) Winter Sleep (Nuri Bilge Ceylan) Her… Continue reading 2014: The Year’s Best Films