Film Reviews

The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, 2015)

It could be said that like the elongated motorway sequence in Solaris (1972), supposedly included to alienate audiences unworthy of an Andrei Tarkovsky film, Miroslav Slaboshpitsky offers a similar manoeuvre by warning us both in the trailer and at the film’s inception that The Tribe will include no subtitles, voice-over or any other explanation of… Continue reading The Tribe (Miroslav Slaboshpitsky, 2015)

Film Reviews

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2015)

In the first years of the 21st century, Hollywood discovered a thirst for male and female characters with superhuman powers. These extraordinary individuals were able to confront the type of modern crime that has progressively rendered the classical systems of state power – the police and governmental intelligence services – helpless. Exploiting the widespread paranoia… Continue reading Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (Alejandro González Iñárritu, 2015)

Notes

2014: The Year’s Best Films

Here’s my list of the ten best films of the year: Leviathan (Andrey Zvyagintsev) Two Days, One Night (Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne)* Boyhood (Richard Linklater) Mr. Turner (Mike Leigh) The Wind Rises (Hayao Miyazaki) Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer) The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson) Starred Up (David Mackenzie) Winter Sleep (Nuri Bilge Ceylan) Her… Continue reading 2014: The Year’s Best Films

Film Reviews

Only Lovers Left Alive: Jim Jarmusch and the Vampire Genre

Although the vampire genre has always proved popular within both cinema and literature, the 21st century has witnessed a staggering rise in the amount of films centred on vampires. From the profoundly beloved Twilight Saga (2008-2012) to the obscure Thirst (Park Chan-wook, 2009) and the upcoming Dracula Untold (Gary Shore, 2014), it would be difficult… Continue reading Only Lovers Left Alive: Jim Jarmusch and the Vampire Genre

Film Reviews

Slow Cinema and Norte, the End of History

  To most audiences, to describe a film as ‘slow’ is to give it a negative value judgement. In answer to the question ‘why didn’t you like the film?’ one often hears the response ‘oh because it was so slow’, especially in relation to non-mainstream and art cinema. The word ‘slow’ regularly works as a… Continue reading Slow Cinema and Norte, the End of History